Zion Art Podcast

The 11th International Art Competition

Every three years, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints holds an art competition spanning the globe and featuring works from members of the Church on a central theme. This year, we were please to be invited to an early viewing of the show and provide our reaction to the show and a number of works that stood out. In this special podcast episode, we dive into the show and the works, and as always would love to hear your thoughts on what stood out to you. Feel free to leave them in the comments below or reach out to us on Instagram @zionartsociety.

The following works were discussed in the episode. For more information visit history.lds.org

And I am Here  by Danielle Hatch. Scripture Paper and wooden armature

And I am Here by Danielle Hatch. Scripture Paper and wooden armature

The Plan of Salvation  by Julie Yuen Yim. Chinese Paper Cutting.

The Plan of Salvation by Julie Yuen Yim. Chinese Paper Cutting.

For Us  by Walter Rane. Oil and Graphic on Canvas.

For Us by Walter Rane. Oil and Graphic on Canvas.

And Should We Die  by Jen Tolman. Oil on panel.

And Should We Die by Jen Tolman. Oil on panel.

Coming Full Circle  by Jenedy Paige. Oil on panel.

Coming Full Circle by Jenedy Paige. Oil on panel.

Ask of God  by Janna Siebert. Glaze and glass sculpture on wood.

Ask of God by Janna Siebert. Glaze and glass sculpture on wood.

Mercy’s Embrace  by Annie Henrie Nader. Acrylic, oil, gesso, charcoal, and metallic paint on wood panel.

Mercy’s Embrace by Annie Henrie Nader. Acrylic, oil, gesso, charcoal, and metallic paint on wood panel.

Living Waters  by Rose Datoc Dall. Oil on canvas.

Living Waters by Rose Datoc Dall. Oil on canvas.

Sorrow and Hope  by Emily McPhie. Oil on panel.

Sorrow and Hope by Emily McPhie. Oil on panel.

Gratitude  by Annette Everett. Bronze.

Gratitude by Annette Everett. Bronze.

An Issue of Blood  by Brian Kershisnik. Oil on canvas.

An Issue of Blood by Brian Kershisnik. Oil on canvas.

The Heavenly Host Praising God  by Stephanie Billings. Digital print.

The Heavenly Host Praising God by Stephanie Billings. Digital print.

He Healed them All  by Michael Malm. Oil on board.

He Healed them All by Michael Malm. Oil on board.

First Vision  by Elizabeth Coughanour. Hand-cut cardstock.

First Vision by Elizabeth Coughanour. Hand-cut cardstock.

Sculptor Ben Hammond

We are back from winter break for a sit down with Ben Hammond, who among other achievements was just awarded the commission to sculpt Martha Hughes Cannon for the US Capitol. The national competition pays homage to the trailblazing Cannon, the first woman to serve in the Utah State Legislature.

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Until the Statuary Hall Curator Committee officially approves Hammond’s design for the Martha Hughes Cannon statue, unfortunately we cannot post any images of the process. But the following images of Hammond’s piece titled Connexion and installed at Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point demonstrates the steps of his sculpting process.

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Dr. Lisa DeLong

In this episode we sit down for a special conversation with Dr. Lisa DeLong, Outreach Programme Manager for the Prince's School in London, and a talented artist in her own right.  

Dr. DeLong will be hosting a geometry workshop on September 13 at Anthony's Fine Art in Salt Lake City

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Works discussed in the episode

Parable of the Seed  by Lisa DeLong. Gold leaf, lapis lazuli, vermillion, gum arabic, Rotring ink, and handmade watercolour on marbled paper.

Parable of the Seed by Lisa DeLong. Gold leaf, lapis lazuli, vermillion, gum arabic, Rotring ink, and handmade watercolour on marbled paper.

Umbilicus  by Lisa DeLong. Ink, gold leaf, and handmade paint on paper.

Umbilicus by Lisa DeLong. Ink, gold leaf, and handmade paint on paper.

This painting was inspired by Lucy Mack Smith’s description of the urim and thummim as “2 smooth 3 cornered diamonds.” I imagined this mysterious tool in geometric form as triangles – one striving heavenward, the other reaching earthward – until a bridge of light was formed. 

Using compasses and square, I built up a composition of triangles. Gradually a pattern revealed itself. While this design has its roots in a traditional Islamic pattern, as I drew and painted, it became something new. The process of discovering a new pattern feels to me very much like the process of revelation. 

I make my own paints – my teachers in London taught that the discipline of preparing one’s materials from the earth was participation refining and purifying matter, elevating it from something base to something spiritual. Preparing my colours becomes a meditation on creativity and Creation. Subtle textures sparkle up and down to make a pillar of light. I chose gold leaf and crushed minerals to reflect and refract the light. Even the glittery black was gathered from the seaside on the island of Hormuz.  

At the very centre of the composition, the navel is marked in blood red – the point where heaven and earth meet. Tiny gold triangles at the top and base of the composition echo the shapes Mother Smith described.

Tyson Snow

A wonderful discussion with artist and sculptor extraordinaire Tyson Snow about his background and the very unique set of circumstances - including recently returning from The Celebration of Fine Art in Scottsdale - that had led him to be one of the most talented and educated sculptors of our day. From enormous monuments to beautiful desktop works, Tyson’s work in bronze is on view throughout the country, specifically in the West.

The Reaper by Tyson Snow   /   bronze   /   28 1/2 × 15 × 12 (in)    /   Date of Creation: 2014. The Reaper won first place in the 2015 International ARC Salon competition at the European Museum of Modern Art in Barcelona, Spain.

The Reaper by Tyson Snow  /  bronze  /  28 1/2 × 15 × 12 (in)   /  Date of Creation: 2014. The Reaper won first place in the 2015 International ARC Salon competition at the European Museum of Modern Art in Barcelona, Spain.

White Fruit #1 & #2 by Tyson Snow

White Fruit #1 & #2 by Tyson Snow

That Man May Be by Tyson Snow

That Man May Be by Tyson Snow

Brad Kramer of Writ & Vision

Brad Kramer is the owner of Provo's Writ & Vision, an art gallery and book store that has specialized in promoting both new and upcoming contemporary art and well-known artists outside of the typical canon of LDS art. His unique background and perspective lend to an interesting role in the arts community in Utah. The discussion looks at this background, his goals as a gallery owner, and some interesting experiences he has had as a gallery owner in the arts hub of the State. 

Lane Twitchell   Buddhascreen  oil, polymers, and wax-based pigments on cut Olfin and Melinex mounted to oil, acrylic, and wax on birch-ply panel, 2016  48” x48”

Lane Twitchell

Buddhascreen

oil, polymers, and wax-based pigments on cut Olfin and Melinex mounted to oil, acrylic, and wax on birch-ply panel, 2016

48” x48”

For more information about upcoming shows and events:

Lane Twitchell show: http://www.writandvision.com/inversion-lane-twitchell/

Annie Poon show: http://www.writandvision.com/the-split-house/

Kirk Richards creation show: http://www.writandvision.com/after-our-likeness-works-by-j-kirk-richards/

Annie Poon Thou Art Not Yet As Job India Ink on Paper, 2016 44.5" x 90"

Annie Poon
Thou Art Not Yet As Job
India Ink on Paper, 2016
44.5" x 90"

Justin Wheatley

Artist and educator Justin Wheatley sits down with us to talk about art through criticism, process, creation, and marketing. His paintings have covered the spectrum from explicitly religious to decorative, but all of these works have shared a deep, personal meaning that transcends the architectural designs and scenes he depicts. 

The Prodigal by Justin Wheatley

The Prodigal by Justin Wheatley

in His Constant Care by Greg Olsen

in His Constant Care by Greg Olsen

Caitlin Connolly

Caitlin Connolly is on the cutting edge of LDS art both in style and subject matter. Her work is seen across the country and has become increasingly recognizable among Church membership. Her unique style comes from years of honing a technique began in high school. The interview delves into her background, her current work and her thoughts on the future of LDS art. 

Detangling My Mind by Caitlin Connolly, 30 x 24 in., Oil on Panel. 

Detangling My Mind by Caitlin Connolly, 30 x 24 in., Oil on Panel. 

Linda Curley Christensen

The podcast hits the road where we were able to tour the studio of Linda Curley Christensen, perhaps the most prolific of any Church-commissioned artist. She has painted the murals for nearly every temple since 2000 and her landscape works can be found in the Conference Center and in Church publications across the world. Her enormous mural studio in Wallsburg, UT was the site for our interview where we got to witness her team prepping, painting, and restoring murals for at least three LDS temples. 

Though we couldn't photograph the murals being worked on in Christensen's studio, it was inspiring to see the menage of photos and reference materials being used by artists to paint accurate depictions of gardens in the Holy Land for the Vernal Temple. 

Though we couldn't photograph the murals being worked on in Christensen's studio, it was inspiring to see the menage of photos and reference materials being used by artists to paint accurate depictions of gardens in the Holy Land for the Vernal Temple. 

Before beginning a mural, Christensen produces scale models, affixed to foam core to present to the relevant authorities to help mock up a version of each room for the proposed temple.

Before beginning a mural, Christensen produces scale models, affixed to foam core to present to the relevant authorities to help mock up a version of each room for the proposed temple.